Dismiss

Security screening

The safety and security of all of our passengers, visitors and staff is our first priority.

In compliance with the Australian Government's aviation security regulations, any person entering a secure zone of the Domestic and International terminal or boarding a flight will be subject to passenger screening. This includes passengers, people accompanying passengers to the boarding gate, aircrew and airport workers.

We encourage you to visit the Australian Government's TravelSECURE website ahead of travel to familiarise yourself with the screening process and the rules around what you can and can't bring onboard your flight.

These security procedures are in place to protect everyone. Please be patient at security screening and respectful of our security team while they perform their roles to keep you safe when travelling from SYD.

Here's some useful information to help you prepare.

What to expect

Passenger screening

Any person entering a secure zone of the Domestic and International terminal or boarding a flight will be subject to passenger screening. This includes passengers, people accompanying passengers to the boarding gate, aircrew and airport workers.

Passenger screening process

  1. Place all personal items, wallets or purses in your carry-on baggage.
  2. Place your bag of liquid, aerosol and gel items in the tray (departing international terminal only). Please note that there are restrictions on the quantity of powders, liquids, aerosols and gels you can carry onboard international flights. Check the TravelSECURE website for more information.
  3. Place any containers of powders in a separate tray (departing international terminal only).Please note that there are restrictions on the quantity of powders, liquids, aerosols and gels you can carry onboard international flights. Check the TravelSECURE website for more information.
  4. Place metallic (keys, coins) and electronic (laptops, mobile phones) items in the tray.
  5. Remove bulky outer wear clothing (e.g. coats, jacket), hats and jewellery, and place them in the tray.
  6. Place your carry-on baggage onto the conveyor belt.
  7. Inform screening officers if you have any medical devices, aids or implants before being screened.
  8. Go through the walkthrough metal detector. If travelling internationally, you may be randomly selected for a body scanner.
  9. You may be asked to go through the security screening process again until you are cleared, if an issue is identified. This may include other screening methods (hand-held metal detector, frisk search).
  10. You may also be randomly selected for explosive trace detection testing after proceeding through the initial screening process.

More information on the passenger screening process can be found on the Australian Government's TravelSECURE website.

Body scanners

All body scanners in Australia use non-ionising millimetre-wave technology. This means they do not emit ionising radiation like that of x-rays.

The low intensity waves and short duration of the scan means you are exposed to less energy than other common everyday devices such as mobile phones. The millimetre-waves are reflected off the surface of the skin and do not penetrate the body.

There are no known health risks from undergoing a scan so travellers who have a medical condition or are pregnant should not be concerned.

Visit the Travelsecure website for information about body scanners.

Explosive Trace Detection (ETD)

Aviation Security Officers may test you and your baggage for traces of explosives. Officers must carry out ETD tests on a random and continuous basis to meet regulatory requirements. If you're selected for a random ETD test, and you decline to undergo testing, you will not be permitted past the security screening point to board your aircraft.

Visit the Australian Government’s TravelSecure website for further information about ETD screening.

Travelling with powders, liquids, aerosols and gels

International travel

If you're travelling overseas, there are restrictions on the quantity of liquids, aerosols and gels and some powders you may carry onboard, including those purchased from duty free. These restrictions apply to all passengers leaving on international flights, as well as those transiting and/or travelling on the domestic leg of an international flight within Australia. Exemptions apply for medicines, medical products, medical devices and baby products that you may need during your journey.

Visit the TravelSECURE website for more information.

Domestic travel

Flights within Australia are not subject to PLAGs restrictions for onboard baggage. However if you are travelling domestically, but departing from T1 International, you are subject to powder, liquid, aerosol and gel restrictions. Visit the TravelSECURE website for more information.

Carry-on baggage screening

Baggage screening is an important measure to improve your security when flying to and from Australia. If you refuse to allow the security screening officer to screen your carry-on bags, you will not be permitted to pass through the security point to board your aircraft.

Some items cannot be taken onboard an aircraft as they have the potential to be used to harm other passengers and crew. A full list of these items can be found on the Australian Government’s TravelSECURE website

If you are unsure if an item is allowed onboard, check with your airline or leave it at home.

Travellers requiring special assistance

If you require special assistance when travelling through the airport, look out for our dedicated special assistance lanes at the security screening point. These lanes are staffed by security officers specifically trained to assist you and help make the security screening process smoother.

Additional information for travellers requiring special assistance can be found on the Assistance section of our website.

Travelling with children

Security screening for children and infants

All travellers, including children, must pass through the security screening point. Children can be carried by an adult if they cannot walk on their own. Strollers and prams must be screened along with other carry-on baggage. Many airlines do not allow these items in the cabin due to space and stowage constraints.

If you're unsure, check with your airline before you travel.

Carry-on baby products

There are no restrictions on the amount of powders, liquids, aerosols and gels you can take onboard a domestic flight for a baby or infant. However if you are connecting to an international flight or if your domestic flight is departing from an international terminal, limits will apply.

You are allowed to carry onboard a reasonable quantity of inorganic powder, liquid, aerosol or gel items for a baby or infant for international flights. Pack only what you need for the duration of a flight and any delays that may occur. There are no quantity restrictions for organic powders such as powdered baby formula.

For more information about travelling with children visit the Travellers with specific needs page of the TravelSecure website.

Travelling with medicine

We recognise there may be occasions when you need to travel with medicines or medical equipment. Exemptions can be made in these cases to ensure you have a safe and comfortable journey.

For information about travelling with medicines visit the Travellers with specific needs page of the TravelSECURE website.

Travelling with laptops and tablets

Laptops and tablets must be taken out of their bag and placed in the tray provided when going through the security screening point. This will ensure screening officers have an unobstructed view as they move through the screening equipment.

For more information visit the security screening process page of the TravelSECURE website.

Frequently Asked Questions

What items are prohibited items that cannot be carried onboard an aircraft?

Items classified as prohibited items, including weapons and dangerous goods, cannot be carried onboard an aircraft. If you have any of these items in your carry on baggage, you will need to surrender these at the screening point.

If in doubt about whether an item can be carried onboard, check with your airline prior to arriving at the airport. In some cases, you may be able to pack the item in your checked baggage. Please refer to the Home Affairs website for further information.

How do the body scanners at the airport work?

All body scanners in Australia use non-ionising millimetre-wave technology. This means they do not emit ionising radiation like that of x-rays.

The low intensity waves and short duration of the scan means you are exposed to less energy than other common everyday devices such as mobile phones. The millimetre-waves are reflected off the surface of the skin and do not penetrate the body.

There are no known health risks from undergoing a scan so travellers who have a medical condition or are pregnant should not be concerned.